Make Me Laugh

February 6, 2011 at 11:22 pm (Uncategorized) (, , , )

Microblogging. The social media outlet that has taken the world by storm seems to be popping up everywhere. These days anyone who is anyone has a microblog account. From celebrities to 10-year-old Beiber maniacs, everyone wants their Tweets to be heard. Today, microblog hot spots like Twitter are major hubs of Internet traffic. With nearly 175 million registered users, Twitter’s content ranges in relevance and credibility. However, with 95 million tweets per day, there is definitely something for everyone.

I was pretty hesitant when my friends first talked me into getting a microblog of my own. The idea of a tweet seemed annoyingly similar to a Facebook status, and I really didn’t care about what people were eating for dinner or about a meaningless daily anecdotes. Once I started microblogging, however, I realized it was way more than just a series of pointless updates. Through Twitter, I found hundreds of people and organizations that provided me with quick and valuable information at one tenth the amount of time to took to read one of the hundreds of company newsletters that clog up my inbox every week.

Entertainment value was another surprising discovery I made of the microblogging world. While breaking news updates and fashion microblogs are incredibly worthwhile, the entertainment value that some of my tweeps inject into tiny 140 character blurbs is both surprising and enjoyable. It’s almost like a friend telling a really funny joke every day. A simple line from a microblogger like @Lord Voldemort7@SororityProblem@TFLN, or anothermicroblogging genius is just the way to cheer me up on a dreary early morning walk to class.

Many successful microbloggers gain followers by offering entertaining information on a daily basis, without going overboard on self-promotion or advertising. This formula follows nicely with our Cocktail Party Theory of social media. A blogger or microblogger should be the one at the party to make everyone laugh. Like the Michael Scott of microblogging or the clever wit whose comments on life and society are hilarious because they’re “so true!” It doesn’t take much. Just a quick, quirky sense of humor and the ability to be concise (140 characters max please) and you’ll find yourself the life of the microblogging party, adored by your many followers.

By Lauren Aylworth

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